Marine

Biofilm formation is a substantial issue in the marine environment, both above and below the water line.

Marine

Biofilm formation is a substantial issue in the marine environment,
both above and below the water line.

Above the water line, the challenging environment presents ideal conditions for bacteria, fungi and algae to thrive and biofilms to form.  The leisure craft market is booming and the requirement for products to ensure clean and hygienic surfaces is growing massively.

Lactams can be utilised in this environment in the same way as with household appliances, using proven spray or mousse formulations to deliver the lactam directly onto the surfaces.

stock-photo-man-washing-white-inflatable-boat-with-brush-and-pressure-water-system-at-garage-ship-service-and-1329482348

Above the water line, the challenging environment presents ideal conditions for bacteria, fungi and algae to thrive and biofilms to form.  The leisure craft market is booming and the requirement for products to ensure clean and hygienic surfaces is growing massively.

Lactams can be utilised in this environment in the same way as with household appliances, using proven spray or mousse formulations to deliver the lactam directly onto the surfaces.

✓   Lactam incorporated into mousse and spray formulation utilising standard Unilever methods
✓   Mousse and spray formulations shown to deliver lactam, durable to rinses, onto surfaces
✓   Strong anti-algae & anti-fungal performance shown at low concentrations

The technology is at TRL 4.  Suitable licence partners under review.

✓   Lactam incorporated into mousse and spray formulation utilising standard Unilever methods

✓   Mousse and spray formulations shown to deliver lactam, durable to rinses, onto surfaces

✓   Strong anti-algae & anti-fungal performance shown at low concentrations

The technology is at TRL 4.  Suitable licence partners under review.

Below the water line, biofouling is a huge issue for all types of underwater assets; ships hulls, subsea energy structures, aquaculture farms and fishing nets, creating significant economic, ecological and environmental challenges.

Below the water line, biofouling is a huge issue for all types of underwater assets; ships hulls, subsea energy structures, aquaculture farms and fishing nets, creating significant economic, ecological and environmental challenges.

The accumulation of marine organisms on hulls over time can increase both hydrodynamic volume and hydrodynamic friction. This leads to increased drag which requires higher fuel consumption, therefore higher costs, to compensate and a consequently negative impact on the environment due to increased CO2 emissions. It also leads to significant opportunity costs as vessels are taken out of the water for cleaning and treatment.

As global shipping traffic increases, so too does the invasion of non-indigenous biofilm bacterial species into new geographical regions creating ecological issues with marine biodiversity.

stock-photo-pressure-washer-cleaning-boat-hull-barnacles-antifouling-and-seaweed-82057435

The accumulation of marine organisms on hulls over time can increase both hydrodynamic volume and hydrodynamic friction. This leads to increased drag which requires higher fuel consumption, therefore higher costs, to compensate and a consequently negative impact on the environment due to increased CO2 emissions. It also leads to significant opportunity costs as vessels are taken out of the water for cleaning and treatment.

As global shipping traffic increases, so too does the invasion of non-indigenous biofilm bacterial species into new geographical regions creating ecological issues with marine biodiversity.

Vast amounts are spent by shipping companies, marine energy and engineering companies as well as private leisure craft owners on anti-biofouling marine coatings. Many of these however are biocidal, containing heavy metals such as lead, copper and cadmium, all of which are now known to be harmful to marine life and may accumulate in the food chain.

For the past two years, Unilever (and now Penrhos Bio) has been working with the world-leading marine research facility, Plymouth Marine Laboratory; www.pml.ac.uk. This work has been investigating the use of lactam as a potential solution to inhibit marine biofouling.

Vast amounts are spent by shipping companies, marine energy and engineering companies as well as private leisure craft owners on anti-biofouling marine coatings. Many of these however are biocidal, containing heavy metals such as lead, copper and cadmium, all of which are now known to be harmful to marine life and may accumulate in the food chain.

For the past two years, Unilever (and now Penrhos Bio) has been working with the world-leading marine research facility, Plymouth Marine Laboratory; www.pml.ac.uk. This work has been investigating the use of lactam as a potential solution to inhibit marine biofouling.

Development work has confirmed the viability of the lactam technology to a range of microbial targets such as the effect on algae. Laboratory tests have confirmed the inhibition of algal growth in the presence of the lactam technology.

Development work has confirmed the viability of the lactam technology to a range of microbial targets such as the effect on algae. Laboratory tests have confirmed the inhibition of algal growth in the presence of the lactam technology.

✓  Lactam can be incorporated within a coating and delivered to a range of surfaces
✓  Lactam shown to be effective against both fresh and sea-water algal and fungal species

The technology is at TRL4. Research and development will continue with PML to further investigate the use of lactams as marine anti-fouling coatings. In parallel, discussions will take place with existing marine anti-fouling coating manufacturers to licence the use of the bioderived lactams for use on ship hulls and a range of other submerged marine surfaces and products.

✓  Lactam can be incorporated within a coating and delivered to a range of surfaces

✓  Lactam shown to be effective against both fresh and sea-water algal and fungal species

The technology is at TRL4. Research and development will continue with PML to further investigate the use of lactams as marine anti-fouling coatings. In parallel, discussions will take place with existing marine anti-fouling coating manufacturers to licence the use of the bioderived lactams for use on ship hulls and a range of other submerged marine surfaces and products.