The Problem

A biofilm is a community of microbial cells that are attached to a surface and are protected by an extracellular polymeric matrix (EPS). Within a biofilm, microbes are exceptionally resilient and present a tremendous obstacle to intervention (cleaning & eradication).

The Problem

A biofilm is a community of microbial cells that are attached to a surface and are protected by an extracellular polymeric matrix (EPS). Within a biofilm, microbes are exceptionally resilient and present a tremendous obstacle to intervention (cleaning & eradication).

Our world is full of bacteria and biofilms are increasingly an issue in everyday life: in the home, workplace, healthcare and leisure environments.

Over 80% of bacterial infections in humans are estimated to involve the formation of biofilms. The antibiotics we use to eliminate harmful bacteria are increasingly ineffective due to the rapid evolution in bacteria of antibiotic resistance. More than 70% of the infections people acquire in hospitals are from bacteria.

Bacteria communicate with each other, particularly when in biofilms, by using small chemical signals that pass between cells (‘Quorum Sensing’). These signalling pathways enable the cells to co-ordinate their activities, such as forming biofilms and production of toxins.

Our world is full of bacteria and biofilms are increasingly an issue in everyday life: in the home, workplace, healthcare and leisure environments.

Over 80% of bacterial infections in humans are estimated to involve the formation of biofilms. The antibiotics we use to eliminate harmful bacteria are increasingly ineffective due to the rapid evolution in bacteria of antibiotic resistance. More than 70% of the infections people acquire in hospitals are from bacteria.

Bacteria communicate with each other, particularly when in biofilms, by using small chemical signals that pass between cells (‘Quorum Sensing’). These signalling pathways enable the cells to co-ordinate their activities, such as forming biofilms and production of toxins.

Our world is full of bacteria and biofilms are increasingly an issue in everyday life: in the home, workplace, healthcare and leisure environments.

Over 80% of bacterial infections in humans are estimated to involve the formation of biofilms. The antibiotics we use to eliminate harmful bacteria are increasingly ineffective due to the rapid evolution in bacteria of antibiotic resistance. More than 70% of the infections people acquire in hospitals are from bacteria.

Bacteria communicate with each other, particularly when in biofilms, by using small chemical signals that pass between cells (‘Quorum Sensing’). These signalling pathways enable the cells to co-ordinate their activities, such as forming biofilms and production of toxins.

Our world is full of bacteria and biofilms are increasingly an issue in everyday life: in the home, workplace, healthcare and leisure environments.

Over 80% of bacterial infections in humans are estimated to involve the formation of biofilms. The antibiotics we use to eliminate harmful bacteria are increasingly ineffective due to the rapid evolution in bacteria of antibiotic resistance. More than 70% of the infections people acquire in hospitals are from bacteria.

Bacteria communicate with each other, particularly when in biofilms, by using small chemical signals that pass between cells (‘Quorum Sensing’). These signalling pathways enable the cells to co-ordinate their activities, such as forming biofilms and production of toxins.

These behavioural responses also include adaptation to availability of nutrients, defence against other micro-organisms which may com­pete for the same nutrients and the avoid­ance of toxic compounds potentially dan­gerous for the bacteria.  All of this complexity makes it extremely challenging to combat biofilm formation and development. 

These behavioural responses also include adaptation to availability of nutrients, defence against other micro-organisms which may com­pete for the same nutrients and the avoid­ance of toxic compounds potentially dan­gerous for the bacteria.  All of this complexity makes it extremely challenging to combat biofilm formation and development. 

These behavioural responses also include adaptation to availability of nutrients, defence against other micro-organisms which may com­pete for the same nutrients and the avoid­ance of toxic compounds potentially dan­gerous for the bacteria.  All of this complexity makes it extremely challenging to combat biofilm formation and development.